Tag Archives: slow food

Irish Slow Food Event

This week an event at the Irish American Heritage Center in Chicago will show that there is much more to Irish food than potatoes.  On Friday, the Galway Committee of Chicago Sister Cities International will celebrate Irish culinary traditions and the Slow Food movement at Taste of Chicago Sister Cities: Slow Food featuring food provided by Irish owned Chicago restaurants and food providers such as the Gage, Farmhouse, Harrington’s Catering and Deli and Galway Bakers.  Non Irish participants include Slow Food advocate Quartino.

The event starts at 6 p.m., Sept. 20 at the Irish American Heritage Center, 4626 N. Knox Avenue, Chicago. Tickets are $50 and are available for purchase at www.ChicagoSisterCities.com. Proceeds benefit the cultural initiatives of the Galway Committee of CSCI, the Irish American Heritage Center and Slow Food.  Chicago Sister Cities is offering a discount on tickets with the promo code: SLOWFOOD.

The event is part of a series of culinary events sponsored by Chicago Sister Cities International highlighting the ethnic cuisine, dining traditions and modern food interpretations of Chicago’s 28 sister cities, including Galway. It is being held in partnership with the Irish American Heritage Center, Slow Food Chicago,Slow Food Galway,Slow Food City’s Edge, Irish American News, Windy City Chef’s, Food Industry News, The Academy of Irish Music and Top Box Foods.

Slow Food is a global, grassroots movement that envisions a world in which all people can eat food that is good for them, good for the people who grow it and good for the planet. Promoted as an alternative to fast food, Slow Food strives to preserve traditional and regional cuisine and encourages farming of plants, seeds and livestock characteristic of the local ecosystem.

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Fast Food vs. Slow Food: It is cheaper to cook at home

The New York Times’ Economix blog post today by Nancy Folbre shared an economic study comparing the costs of making a cheeseburger at home with going to a fast food restaurant for a cheeseburger.  I was gratified that science confirmed my gut feeling that is is less expensive to cook at home than eat out — and the study didn’t even account for differences in flavor and nutrition.  So get into that kitchen and rattle those pots and pans.  It will save you money and taste better.

Fast  Food vs. Slow Food

http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/